Starkey’s Livio AI Featured in ‘TIME’s 100 Best Inventions of 2019′ List

The Keynsham hearing centre are excited to learn that Starkey’s Livio AI has featured in the ”Time’s 100 Best.

Starkey Hearing Technologies announces that Livio AI, “the world’s first multi-purpose hearing aid,” has earned a place on TIME’s 100 Best Inventions of 2019 in the accessibility category. This list is said to “highlight inventions that are making the world better, smarter, and even a bit more fun.”

Bath hearing centre

Starkey Livio AI hearing aid available at the Keynsham hearing centre.

Starkey Livio AI, at Keynsham hearing

TIME uses a multi-step process to assemble the annual list. Contenders from around the world are evaluated on key factors, including originality, effectiveness, ambition, and influence. The result: One hundred groundbreaking inventions that are changing the way we live, work, play, and think about what’s possible, according to Starkey’s announcement.

Livio AI  features integrated sensors and artificial intelligence, providing what the company says is “superior sound quality and the ability to track both body and brain health.” By providing direct monitoring of physical and cognitive activity, including fall alerts and transcription features, Livio AI helps raise awareness about the connection between treating hearing loss and reducing health risks, like cognitive decline and heart disease.

Somerset hearing centre

“I’d like to thank TIME for this incredible recognition. We are humbled and proud to be on this list and in the company of other innovative companies that are truly making the world a better place,” said Starkey President Brandon Sawalich. “I’m grateful to the entire Starkey team for its relentless dedication to helping people hear better, so they can live better. Thank you for continuing to push us to break technological boundaries and transform hearing health as we know it.”

The new issue of TIME, featuring Starkey and Livio AI, goes on sale November 22.

Source: Starkey Hearing Technologies 

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Signia Pure Charge & Go X Hearing Aid Bristol

Signia Pure Charge & Go X Hearing Aids are available at the Keynsham hearing centre between Bristol and Bath.

 

Signia Pure Charge & Go X Hearing Aids are available at the Keynsham hearing centre. The hearing centre is renowned for the latest hearing devices on the market today.  Stephen Neal, the lead audiologist at Keynsham is a fully qualified hearing expert that is also a ear wax removal specialist.

If you need ear wax removing or ”Syringing” please call reception and ask for Anita to book an appointment.

Bath ear wax removal

You can watch how ear wax is removed by using Microsuction here. This is our very latest Microsuction video to show how easy and quickly it really is.

If you are suffering with hearing loss and need a hearing test, we can test your ears to see if there is any hearing loss at all in either ear and then discuss what the best solution (if needed), would be best for you.

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Keynsham hearing news:

 

Signia Launches Pure Charge&Go X Hearing Aid

Published on 

Signia (a brand of WS Audiology A/S) announced the general availability of the Pure Charge&Go X. Built upon the recently launched Signia Xperience platform, the new devices are said to provide wearers with “superior hearing even when in motion—all in a sleek, rechargeable hearing aid.”

Pure Charge&Go X is a receiver-in-canal (RIC) device that includes “the world’s first acoustic-motion sensors,” according to the company’s announcement. Since a hearing aid wearer’s sound environment can change suddenly, this technology can reportedly adapt to changes in their soundscape and detect when the wearer is in motion, responding automatically to “deliver natural and personalised sound from any direction, in any situation—even when moving.”

Bath hearing centre.

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Microsuction at the Keynsham hearing centre, Bath.

With 20% more battery capacity and and a size 16% smaller than the previous version, according to Signia, Pure Charge&Go X is said to provide “a comfortable, long-lasting wearing experience.”

Better hearing for a life in motion

The technology and features of Pure Charge&Go X help wearers navigate everyday life, whether on the go at work or at home with family. For instance, Reed Doughty, a 37-year-old former professional football player and current school athletic director, benefits from the acoustic-motion sensors to help him understand speech from any direction throughout his busy day.

“I go from a weight room, to a board meeting room, to a classroom, to an athletic field, to the loud gym, to home with four kids, to a dinner out with my wife,” Doughty said. “Being able to navigate these settings and not just get through but actually enjoy those experiences is great, because those loud and differing environments can be frustrating for someone with hearing loss.”

Terry Hanratty is another former football pro who, after playing for eight seasons and working on Wall Street for three decades, is used to being on the go. For this active 71-year-old, hearing is important for a good quality of life and staying connected. An experienced wearer, Hanratty found more success with Signia’s Pure Charge&Go X compared to his previous pair.

“They are really a game changer, because with the previous ones, I could hear, but I couldn’t hear everything,” Hanratty said. “The biggest factor is that I can hear every word. I carry on a conversation with anybody and I’m hearing everything.”

Advanced technology in a smaller device

The new Pure Charge&Go X hearing aids deliver hearing technology with the features important to today’s hearing aid wearers like Doughty and Hanratty. They offer Bluetooth connectivity to stream phone calls, music, and TV audio to their hearing aids. Wearers also benefit from Signia’s world’s first Own Voice Processing (OVP), which processes the wearer’s voice separately from other sounds for a “natural sounding own voice.”

The Pure Charge&Go X, available at the Keynsham hearing centre, Bath

The Pure Charge&Go X is said to offer Signia Xperience hearing technology with lithium-ion recharge-ability and full Bluetooth connectivity.

Built with lithium-ion recharge-ability, Pure Charge&Go X reportedly holds 20% more battery capacity than Signia’s previous Pure Charge&Go device, giving wearers greater flexibility and convenience as they go about their day, the company says.

A new inductive charger includes a protective lid that also dehumidifies the devices and fits custom earmolds. The charger is also backwards compatible with all Signia lithium-ion inductive charging hearing aids.

Signia Pure Charge & Go X Hearing Aid Bristol

Pure Charge&Go X is also compatible with the newly launched Signia app, which combines all existing Signia apps into one. The new app enables wearers to further personalise the hearing experience, manage streaming activities, and even connect with their hearing care professional remotely.

Additional information about Signia’s new Pure Charge&Go X hearing aids can be found at: https://www.signia-hearing.co.uk/pure-charge-go-x

 

Images: Signia

 

 

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2020 Oticon hearing aids available in Bath

2020 Oticon hearing aids available in Bath at the Keynsham hearing centre near near Bristol

 

Oticon hearing products are at the vanguard of hearing technology. Their hearing aids really are at the cutting edge of what is available today that can help anyone with hearing loss. We at the Keynsham Hearing Centre are proud to offer Oticon hearing aids and would be very happy to advise which type & model would suit your hearing loss. We also stock and procure the top world wide manufacturers of hearing aids and hearing products. We are not tied to sell one main manufacturers hearing aids.

As an independent hearing company and not tied to any manufacturer, we will only advise what hearing aid is best suited to your hearing loss and budget. Be assured we only have your hearing in mind, and not a target to sell so many hearing aids per month.

If you feel you may need a hearing test we offer appointments throughout the day and week. Please call to make a hearing appointment or ear wax removal appointment.

Keynhsam Hearing News

 

Oticon Xceed and RemoteCare Named as Honourees in CES 2020 Innovation Awards

Oticon Xceed with ON app, Keynsham hearing centre near Bath and Bristol

Oticon announced that the Consumer Electronics Association (CES) has named Oticon Xceed and Oticon RemoteCare as honourees in the CES 2020 Innovation Awards. The international awards program annually selects the best of the best in consumer electronics. Oticon Xceed, said to be “the world’s most powerful hearing aid,” earned honours in the Health & Wellness category.  Oticon RemoteCare, a new e-health solution that will help enable hearing care professionals to provide aftercare service to their patients (to be released in 2020), was honoured in the Tech for a Better World category.

This is the fourth consecutive year that Oticon has been recognised by this international awards program.  The two newest awards bring to 10 the number of times Oticon has received CES Innovation Awards, including three top-ranked Best of Innovation category wins.

“We are extremely proud to have Oticon Xceed and Oticon RemoteCare honoured by the Consumer Electronics Association,” said Oticon President Gary Rosenblum. “Our ability to consistently stand out in a competition that includes some of the world’s most cutting-edge consumer technology products and services underscores Oticon’s commitment to develop hearing technology that makes a real difference in people’s lives.”

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Oticon Xceed features a new approach to hearing care for individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss that is said to help deliver better speech clarity and better short-term recall while reducing the listening effort this patient population struggles with in most situations every day.

Keynsham hearing centre near Bath and Bristol

Oticon Xceed

According to Oticon, Xceed is the “first super- and ultra-power hearing aid with OpenSound Navigator and OpenSound Optimiser, BrainHearing technologies that support more access to speech.” The technology in Xceed reportedly “empowers hearing care professionals to deliver industry-leading optimal output and gain—146dB SPL and 87 dB full on gain—without the high risk of feedback.”

Convenient Follow-up Care Benefits Practitioner and Patient

When launched in 2020, Oticon says its RemoteCare will “facilitate easier access to the personalised care that qualified hearing care practitioners provide and that hearing aid wearers require,” helping to allow hearing care professionals to provide optimal support for their patients at a mutually convenient time. RemoteCare will also help provide hearing care professionals and patients with easy access to follow-up appointments, especially convenient during the first days and weeks with new hearing aids. The Oticon RemoteCare App also helps enables data communication between the users’ hearing aids and the hearing care professional via a stable Internet connection, the company says. Hearing care practitioners can help make necessary adjustments in real time—just as if the patient was in the clinic—and receive immediate feedback.

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“By providing a global showcase for our newest hearing technology, prestigious awards like the CES Innovation Awards help us to show the world the wide-ranging possibilities of modern hearing technology to improve not only hearing, but quality of life,” said Rosenblum.

To learn more about Oticon Xceed, visit: www.oticon.com/xceed.  For more information on the comprehensive Oticon product portfolio, visit: www.oticon.com.

Source: Oticon

Images: Oticon

I

Bristol hearing aid experts

 

It has been estimated that only 1-in-5 people who need a hearing aid wears one.

Audiologist Stephen Neal of The Keynsham hearing centre, Somerset thinks that is unfortunate.

He has been fitting people with hearing aids for more than 20 years and says today’s technology has something for just about everyone’s hearing loss.

Hearing experts for Bristol

He says hearing aids now are smaller and can be regulated more discreetly and that the computer chips inside them recognise different sound types and can be programmed to adjust volume accordingly as well as to meet an individual’s specific hearing needs.

Blue Tooth technology allows for direct streaming of sound into the ears from smartphones and other devices and, he adds, always improving applications from manufacturers enable those phones to act as remote controls in adjusting volume and sound in a variety of settings as well.

“Sometimes people have the idea that there is nothing that can be done for them. They might feel their hearing is not bad enough or they might feel like their hearing is so bad that nothing can be done,”

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“Sometimes I find they were told 40 years ago, hearing aids won’t help you. If there is anyone who heard that, that is not true today. The technology can fit a wide range of hearing losses from mild to profound and, if it gets to the point where hearing aids don’t do the trick, we refer people for a cochlear implant and they can have that and that technology continues to get better, too.”

Stephen Neal is available for hearing consultations and ear wax removal. Please call reception and speak with Anita.

Hearing centre Bath

 

 

If you are in need of a hearing centre in the Bath area we are located in Keynsham very close to Bath. We specialise in ear wax removal (see our ear syringing video here), and we are experts in hearing aids, supplying and fitting the very latest 2020 versions of digital hearing instruments.  We are a local independent company that are very competitive on price for hearing aids.  Ear wax removal we use Micro-suction or the traditional water irrigation method.

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Keynsham Hearing News :

 

Smartphone App to Detect Ear Infections Developed at University of Washington

Ear infections are the most common reason that parents bring their children to a paediatrician, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

This condition occurs when fluid builds up in the middle ear behind the eardrum and is infected. This buildup is also common in another condition called otitis media with effusion. Any kind of fluid buildup can be painful and make it hard for children to hear, which can be especially detrimental when they are learning to talk.

Both conditions are hard to diagnose because they have vague symptoms: Sometimes children tug on their ears or have fevers, and sometimes there are no symptoms. In addition, young children may not be able to describe where they hurt.

Dr. Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the UW School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children’s Hospital, uses the app to check his daughter’s ear.Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Dr Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the UW School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children’s Hospital, uses the app to check his daughter’s ear. Photo credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Now researchers at the University of Washington have created a new smartphone app that can detect fluid behind the eardrum by simply using a piece of paper and a smartphone’s microphone and speaker. An article detailing the app’s functionality is posted on the University of Washington’s media portal, UW NewsThe smartphone makes a series of soft audible chirps into the ear through a small paper funnel and, depending on the way the chirps are reflected back to the phone, the app determines the likelihood of fluid present with a probability of detection of 85%. This is on par with current methods used by specialists to detect fluid in the middle ear, which involve specialised tools that use acoustics or a puff of air.

The team published its results May 15 in Science Translational Medicine.

Bath hearing aids

“Designing an accurate screening tool on something as ubiquitous as a smartphone can be game changing for parents as well as health care providers in resource-limited regions,” said co-author Shyam Gollakota, an associate professor in the UW’s Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. “A key advantage of our technology is that it does not require any additional hardware other than a piece of paper and a software app running on the smartphone.”

Once diagnosed, ear infections can be easily treated with observation or antibiotics, and persistent fluid can be monitored or drained by a doctor to relieve symptoms of pain or hearing loss. A quick screening at home could help parents decide whether or not they need to take their child to the doctor.

This app works by sending sounds into the ear and measuring how those sound waves change as they bounce off the eardrum. The team’s system involves a smartphone and a regular piece of paper that the doctor or parent can cut and fold into a funnel. The funnel rests on the outer ear and guides sound waves in and out of the ear canal. When the phone plays a continuous 150 millisecond sound—which sounds like a bird chirping—through the funnel, the sound waves bounce off the eardrum, travel back through the funnel, and are picked up by the smartphone’s microphone along with the original chirps. Depending on whether there’s fluid inside, the reflected sound waves interfere with the original chirp sound waves differently.

“It’s like tapping a wine glass,” said co-first author Justin Chan, a doctoral student in the Allen School. “Depending on how much liquid is in it, you get different sounds. Using machine learning on these sounds, we can detect the presence of liquid.”

When there is no fluid behind the eardrum, the eardrum vibrates and sends a variety of sound waves back. These sound waves mildly interfere with the original chirp, creating a broad, shallow dip in the overall signal. But when the eardrum has fluid behind it, it doesn’t vibrate as well and reflects the original sound waves back. They interfere more strongly with the original chirp and create a narrow, deep dip in the signal.

Bath ear syringing

To train an algorithm that detects changes in the signal and classifies ears as having fluid or not, the team tested 53 children between the ages of 18 months and 17 years at Seattle Children’s Hospital. About half of the children were scheduled to undergo surgery for ear tube placement, a common surgery for patients with chronic or recurrent incidents of ear fluid. The other half were scheduled to undergo a different surgery unrelated to ears, such as a tonsillectomy.

“What is really unique about this study is that we used the gold standard for diagnosing ear infections,” said co-first author Dr Sharat Raju, a surgical resident in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the UW School of Medicine. “When we put in ear tubes, we make an incision into the eardrum and drain any fluid present. That’s the best way to tell if there is fluid behind the eardrum. So these surgeries created the ideal setting for this study.”

After parents provided informed consent, the team recorded the chirps and their resulting sound waves from the patients’ ears immediately before surgery. Many of the children responded to the chirps by smiling or laughing.

The system uses a regular piece of paper cut and folded into a funnel to guide sound waves in and out of the ear canal. Photo credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington

The system uses a regular piece of paper cut and folded into a funnel to guide sound waves in and out of the ear canal. Photo credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Among the children getting their ear tubes placed, surgery revealed that 24 ears had fluid behind the eardrum, while 24 ears did not. For children scheduled for other surgeries, two ears had bulging eardrums characteristic of an ear infection, while the other 48 ears were fine. The algorithm correctly identified the likelihood of fluid 85% of the time, which is comparable to current methods that specialised doctors use to diagnose fluid in the middle ear.

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Then the team tested the algorithm on 15 ears belonging to younger children between 9 and 18 months of age. It correctly classified all five ears that were positive for fluid and nine out of the 10 ears, or 90%, that did not have fluid.

“Even though our algorithm was trained on older kids, it still works well for this age group,” said co-author Dr Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the UW School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children’s Hospital. “This is critical because this group has a high incidence of ear infections.”

Because the researchers want parents to be able to use this technology at home, the team trained parents how to use the system on their own children. Parents and doctors folded paper funnels, tested 25 ears, and compared the results. Both parents and doctors successfully detected the six fluid-filled ears. Parents and doctors also agreed on 18 out of the 19 ears with no fluid. In addition, the sound wave curves generated by both parent and doctor tests looked similar.

“The ability to know how often and for how long fluid has been present could help us make the best management decisions with patients and parents,” Bly said. “It also could help primary care providers know when to refer to a specialist.”

See a related story from NPR.

The team also tested the algorithm on a variety of smartphones and used different types of paper to make the funnel. The results were consistent regardless of phone or paper type. The researchers plan on commercialising this technology through a spin-out company, Edus Health, and then making the app available to the public.

“Fluid behind the eardrum is so common in children that there’s a direct need for an accessible and accurate screening tool that can be used at home or in clinical settings,” Raju said. “If parents could use a piece of hardware they already have to do a quick physical exam that can say ‘Your child most likely doesn’t have ear fluid’ or ‘Your child likely has ear fluid, you should make an appointment with your pediatrician,’ that would be huge.”

Rajalakshmi Nandakumar, a doctoral student in the Allen School, is also a co-author on this paper. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the NIH, and the Seattle Children’s Sie-Hatsukami Research Endowment.

Original Paper: Chan J, Raju S, Nandakumar R, Bly R, Gollakota S. Detecting middle ear fluid using smartphones. Science Translational Medicine. 2019;11(492):eaav1102.

 

Tinnitus and hearing loss Bath & Bristol

Bellow is an informative new paper released in September 2019. If you suffer from hearing loss and Tinnitus it could be something to look at.

 

Does Tinnitus Get Worse as Hearing Loss Increases in Severity?

Our results suggest that tinnitus will likely get louder, but not by very much,” write Hashir Aazh, PhD, and Richard Salvi, PhD, in their recent study published in JAAA which shows only a weak association between tinnitus loudness and puretone average (PTA) thresholds.

When patients ask an audiologist or hearing care professional if their tinnitus (ringing in the ears) is going to get worse as their hearing loss progresses, what answer do they usually receive? Most hearing care professionals will reassure the patient by telling them that, although it’s possible for this to occur, it’s generally not a problem they’ve observed in their practice. Now there is some clinical science to back up this answer.

paper published in the September 2019 edition of the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology by Hashir Aazh, PhD, and Richard Salvi, PhD, shows that the relationship between tinnitus loudness and puretone average (PTA) thresholds are only weakly associated.

Tinnitus and hearing loss Bath & Bristol

Hashir Aazh, PhD

The researchers looked at a retrospective cross-sectional sample of 445 consecutive patients at the Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Therapy Specialist Clinic in Guildford, UK, who had been surveyed with audiological and self-report questionnaires. The patients were seen from 2013 to 2016 and had an average age of 54.4 years, with an even split between males (49%) and females (51%). Questionnaires included the visual analog scale (VAS), tinnitus handicap inventory (THI), hyperacusis questionnaire (HQ), hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), and the insomnia severity index (ISI).

Richard Salvi, PhD

In the sample, a total of 12% of patients had no tinnitus handicap on the THI, while 32% had mild, 24% had moderate, and 33% had severe tinnitus handicap. Based on PTA for the better ear, 66% of the tinnitus patients had no hearing loss, 29% had mild hearing loss, and 5% had moderate hearing loss. For the worse ear, 49% of patients had no hearing loss, 36% had a mild loss, 13% had a moderate loss, while 0.6% and 0.9% had a severe and profound hearing loss respectively.

When analyzing tinnitus severity and hearing loss via a regression model, a .036 increase in loudness per 1-dB increase in PTA threshold was found at a significant level of confidence. “This relationship is very weak and the linear model explains only 4% of the variance in tinnitus loudness, suggesting that factors other than severity of hearing loss may contribute to self-report tinnitus loudness,” write the authors.

However, correlations were noted between tinnitus severity and the other variables measured in the questionnaires. These included:

  • Based on the HQ score, 32% experienced hyperacusis (unusual sensitivity/aversion to louder sounds) with 4% being diagnosed with severe hyperacusis.
  • While 31% did not have insomnia, 29.5% had mild insomnia, while 27.5% and 12% had moderate or severe insomnia respectively.
  • Tinnitus loudness was more strongly correlated with tinnitus annoyance and tinnitus life effect than PTA.

The authors hypothesise that the weak association between PTA and tinnitus severity could be explained by an increase in spontaneous activity within the central nervous system (CNS) after cochlear damage, as cited in other studies. However, the authors also note the weak correlation “may be due to the fact that threshold measures do not accurately capture some forms of cochlear pathology that may trigger tinnitus.” For example, it’s possible that some forms of tinnitus might arise from damaged inner hair cells or afferent synapses, but these types of cochlear damage are often not reflected in an audiogram (eg, cochlear synaptopathy or “hidden hearing loss”).

Drs Aazh and Salvi conclude, “Tinnitus patients often ask whether the loudness of their tinnitus will increase if their hearing gets worse. Our results suggest that tinnitus will likely get louder, but not by very much.” They note that the study was limited to information gathered in day-to-day clinics and did not include psychoacoustic measures of tinnitus loudness which might be useful in further research.

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Dr Aazh is head of the Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Therapy Specialist Clinic at the Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in Guildford, UK. Dr Salvi is the co-founder and director of the Center for Hearing and Deafness at the University of Buffalo. —KES

Original paper: Aazh H, Salvi R. The relationship between severity of hearing loss and subjective tinnitus loudness among patients seen in a specialist tinnitus and hyperacusis therapy clinic in UK. J Am Acad Audiol. 2019;30(8)[Sept]:712-719.

About the author: Karl E. Strom is editor of The Hearing Review and has been reporting on hearing healthcare issues for over 25 years.

 

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Signia Introduces Xperience Platform with Motion Sensor Technology

A post by the Keynsham hearing centre

The new Pure 312 X hearing aid: a discreet personalized hearing aid with direct streaming.

The new Pure 312 X hearing aid: a discreet personalised hearing aid with direct streaming.

Signia, a brand of WS Audiology A/S, has launched Signia Xperience, a new platform that reportedly introduces the world’s first combination of advanced acoustic sensors with a built-in motion sensor. Signia Xperience hearing aids are designed to provide a complete analysis of the wearer’s dynamic soundscape, allowing for automatic adjustments between sounds in front of and all around the wearer for a personalised listening experience.

Bath hearing Company

Many hearing aid wearers have an active lifestyle and are always on the go—yet, current hearing aids don’t always keep up relative to hearing in noise. Existing hearing aids are sometimes unable to adapt to diverse listening environments as the wearer moves around. The Signia Xperience platform, built upon YourSound technology, was developed to fill this crucial gap and respond to rapid changes in the wearer’s environment.

YourSound Technology

Patricia (Tish) Ramirez, AuD

Patricia (Tish) Ramirez, AuD

With the new YourSound technology, Signia Xperience hearing aids can identify more variables from the environment than ever before and ensure they know what is important at every moment, according to the company. They also include a built-in motion sensor to take into consideration how the wearer’s movement affects their hearing in each situation. In a conversation with The Hearing Review, Signia Vice President of Clinical Education & Professional Relations Tish Ramirez, AuD, provided information about how the system can identify soundscapes in dynamic listening situations, and then intelligently apply omni-directional, directional, and narrow-band microphone technology in addition to advanced processing algorithms to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in changing acoustic environments. For example, she described a “cocktail party” scene where a listener might wish to walk through the party and hear the “omni” environment, then stop to chat and enjoy a one-on-one conversation where narrow-band directionality might be engaged, but also benefit from detection of important noises in back (eg, a waiter asking if you need something) as the hearing aid adjusts accordingly.

Bath and Bristol hearing aids and Ear Wax Removal

In essence, the new Signia Xperience is designed to enable wearers to continuously benefit from the proper amount of frontal focus, says Dr Ramirez, while still being able to hear relevant speech from other directions, like when running in a park with friends or walking down a busy street. Although inertial sensors have been employed in other hearing aids, Dr Ramirez says this is the first time these sensors have been employed for addressing SNR, ambient modulation, own-voice features, and more, enhancing the hearing aid’s speech-in-noise performance in a wider variety of acoustic settings.

The three key features of YourSound technology are:

  • Acoustic-motion sensors for a complete analysis of each wearer’s dynamic soundscape;
  • Dynamic Soundscape Processing for natural sound and speech from any direction, in any situation—even when moving, and
  • Own Voice Processing (OVP™) for a natural sounding own voice.

YourSound technology is delivered by the powerful Signia Xperience chip. It includes 80% more transistors and 7 times the memory of the previous Signia Nx chip, while being 60% smaller. As a result, the first two hearing aids on the platform, the Pure® 312 X and the Pure® Charge&Go X, are smaller yet more powerful than their predecessors.

A New Sound and New Look for Pure 312 X

Available now, the Pure 312 X includes all the benefits of the Signia Xperience platform in a new, appealing design created in collaboration with hearing care professionals and hearing aid wearers. With long-lasting exchangeable batteries, plus an optional telecoil (available in December), this high-performing receiver-in-canal (RIC) hearing aid is said to deliver a more personal hearing experience, with a clean, ergonomic design. Pure 312 X also has Bluetooth® connectivity for effortless streaming of phone calls, music, and TV audio.

New Features for Pure Charge&Go X

Pure Charge&Go X combines all advantages of the Signia Xperience platform with lithium-ion rechargeability and full Bluetooth (BT) connectivity.

Pure Charge&Go X combines all advantages of the Signia Xperience platform with lithium-ion recharge-ability and full Bluetooth (BT) connectivity.

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Coming in November, Pure Charge&Go X is a RIC with Bluetooth connectivity that combines the advantages of the Signia Xperience platform with lithium-ion recharge-ability. With 20% more charging capacity and 16% smaller than the previous Pure Charge&Go Nx, wearers benefit from a slim device that can support a long wear time even with streaming, says Signia.

Pure Charge&Go X features a rocker switch for easier adjustments and comes with a new inductive charger with a lid to protect the hearing aids as they charge. The charger also works as a dehumidifier and is designed to fit custom ear molds.

The new charger will be backward compatible to existing rechargeable Signia devices, and also affords a 30-minute fast-charge that can give wearers 6 hours of operation.

The Signia App: Three Apps in One

The Signia app provides hearing aid wearers with everything they need for a personalized wearing experience, including remote control, remote support, and audio streaming.

The Signia app provides hearing aid wearers with everything they need for a personalised wearing experience, including remote control, remote support, and audio streaming.

Bristol Hearing aids

Along with these two new products, the Signia Xperience introduces a new app. The Signia app combines the three existing Signia apps—the myHearing app for remote telecaretouchControl app (for non-BT), and myControl app(for BT aids)— into one unified environment to meet every user’s needs, including:

  • Providing wearers with direct support from a hearing care professional;
  • Remote control so the wearer can personalise their hearing experience, and
  • Easy management of streaming accessories to fully enjoy phone calls, music, and TV.

Available in S-Demos. As with the Signia Nx, the new hearing aids will also be available for hearing care professionals in models that can be demonstrated to patients on a timed-trial basis.

Additional information about the Signia Xperience platform can be found at: https://pro.signiausa.com/signia-xperience/

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New custom hearing aids Bath

New custom hearing aids Bath, at the Keynsham hearing centre near Bristol and Bath

 

 

New custom hearing aids Bath are now available at the Keynsham hearing centre. Hearing aids have transformed the way people live and work in recent technology advances. Today hearing aids can be tailored to an individual like never before.  The days of plain analogue amplification of every noise in the room or outdoors have pretty much gone.  The latest digital hearing aids are so clever that they can in most instances only increase the level of the frequency loss and not any other frequency making the hearing aids more uncomfortable sonic wise.

Hearing aids Bath

Here at Keynsham hearing we know what how to get the best from your new hearing aids. After a comprehensive hearing test we will know what level of hearing loss you maybe experiencing.  With this knowledge we then can decide what type of hearing aid you may need to make your hearing a lot better.  Once we have this information we can then go onto tailoring the actual aid. New to the market are hearing aids that sit in the ear canal and are now more powerful in helping you hear far better than the traditional over the ear type. This is new and exciting times fro hearing aids. Stephen Neal is an expert audiologist at Keynsham and will gladly take you through the process of getting your hearing back on track.

Below is a press release explaining how the new in ear hearing aids have advanced. It’s an interesting read!

 

Please call or book an appointment with Anita on reception to start your journey back to hearing again.

 

 

Keynsham Hearing News:

 

Great Sound in Miniature: GN Hearing Introduces New Custom-crafted Hearing Aids

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Aug. 30, 2019 11:00 UTC

BALLERUP, Denmark–(BUSINESS WIRE)– GN Hearing, the global leader in hearing aid connectivity, today launched a suite of new custom-crafted hearing aids. The new portfolio packages the industry renowned ReSound LiNX Quattro™ technology – a brilliant experience with Layers of Sound, great speech intelligibility even in noisy situations, and excellent streaming – into discreet custom-crafted hearing aids. While taking up as little space as possible in the ear canal, users will benefit from an impressive listening experience.

Bath hearing aids

Great hearing is in high demand. Not only are 466 million people around the world living with disabling hearing lossi, ReSound LiNX Quattro has also seen a positive reception in the market, which has led to the launch of new custom hearing aids for this popular model. The new custom-crafted hearing aids can enrich people’s lives with all the qualities of hearing, such as socializing, learning, and working optimally. In addition, each hearing aid is designed to fit exactly to the ear canal of every individual user, using a 3D scanner and advanced personalized modelling. Sitting discreetly in the ear canal, the design can also bring extra confidence to the user.

Beristol hearing aids

ReSound LiNX Quattro is a clear number one for streaming. In an independent study, streaming music and speech from an iPhone was top-rated for ReSound LiNX Quattro compared to other hearing aidsii. Users can benefit from using the new small and discreet custom-crafted hearing aids for taking calls and streaming their favourit music and TV shows. They can also stream sound directly to the hearing aids from an iPhone with no need for intermediate devices and the hearing aids are built for direct Android™ streaming, tooiii.

“ReSound LiNX Quattro has been very well received by people with hearing loss. We are dedicated to bringing the technological benefits to more users, who prefer wearing their hearing aids discreetly in the ear canal,” said Jakob Gudbrand, President and CEO of GN Hearing. “These technological wonders in miniature are truly personalized and custom-crafted to fit each person’s hearing, yet with the brilliant experience with Layers of Sound and excellent streaming that people appreciate.”

Four new options are available: the first Completely-in-Canal (CIC) 2.4 GHz wireless hearing aid for direct streaming, high-quality In-the-Canal (ITC) and In-the-Ear (ITE) models, and the industry’s only Mic-in-Helix (MIH) hearing aid. Each custom-crafted hearing aid comes in five skin-tone colors to ensure that they are personal and discreet for every user.

Browse the ReSound customs portfolio.

The new custom-crafted hearing aids are now also available in the Beltone AmazeTM collection.